"Reflections of the Revolution"

4 Aug 2017
Description

The exhibition "Reflections of the Revolution" was recently opened in the garden of the Museum of Political History of Russia. It is dedicated to the 100th anniversary of the revolution in Russia.

The exhibition presents four art objects made by contemporary artists Dmitry Fedin, Anton Chumak, Anna Sosenskaya and Natalia Kuznetsova, Andrei Lublinsky and Ilya Ovsyannikov.

The exhibition was a continuation of the project "Public art for the political history of Russia." The jury selected the works at the installation competition held at the Museum of Russian Political History from June 5 to July 5, 2017.

At the event’s opening, the museum's main curator and director, Svetlana Khodakovskaya, recalled that the attitude toward the revolution varies depending on the epoch. In Soviet times, society crowned the revolution with a sacred halo. The work of contemporary young artists allows us to see how the era reflects its influences in the artist’s creations. Khodakovskaya admitted saying “We did not know whether or not the exhibition would succeed, until literally the last day when we saw the work of the artists, and in the end, the exhibition turned out to be very interesting.”

"Public art is the most efficient way to integrate art into the everyday life. А spectator can simply walk in the garden and appreciate the works, and doesn’t even have to go inside the museum," says the curator of the project, fine art expert Alexei Boyko. “It is curious that the authors did not criticize the revolution, on the contrary, they treated it as an important and exciting historical event, each of the exhibitors expressed their opinion,” Boyko noted.

"The theme of the revolution is important, as there is still no reconciliation between the “Reds” and the “Whites," says Anton Chumak, one of the participants of the exhibition."At the same time, the society has a request for a rethinking of this event, the artist believes.

The exhibition will be displayed in the garden of the museum until September 17. Free admission.